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Native Americans were the first people to live in America. Learn more about the Apache tribe.

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Apache Tribe

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Apache Chief Geronimo
Geronimo was a famous
Apache chieftain who was
captured when fighting.

The word "Apache" comes from the Yuma word for "Fighting Men" and from the Zuni word meaning "Enemy." The Apache tribe consists of six sub tribes: the Western Apache, Chiricahua, Mescalero, Jicarilla, Lipan and Kiowa. Each sub tribe is from a different geographical region. They are composed of six regional groups: Western Apache - Coyote - most of eastern Arizona which include the White Mountain, Cibuecue, San Carlos, and Northern and Southern Tonto bands. It is possible, due to their nomadic nature that several names were used to identify the same tribe. The Anglo theory is the Apache Indian migrated to the Southwest from Northern Canada in the 1500's. The Apache Indian history says it was the other way around, that most of the Athabaskan speaking people migrated to the North and a few stayed in their homeland. In any event, it is generally agreed that about 5,000 Apaches lived in the Southwest at the end of the 1600's.

Apache Women
Apache women cooked on outdoor
campfires like this one.

Apaches belong to the Southern Athabaskan linguistic family, a Native American people inhabiting the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Various Apache tribes offered strong resistance to encroachment on their territory in the latter half of the 19th century. Present-day Apache populations are located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Apache is the collective name given to several culturally related tribes of Native Americans, aboriginal inhabitants of North America, who speak a Southern Athabaskan language. The modern term excludes the related Navajo people. The Apache peoples migrated from the Northern Plains into the Southwest relatively recently. Noted leaders have included Cochise, Mangas Coloradoans, and Geronimo. The U.S. Army found them to be fierce warriors and skillful strategists.

Apache Wickiups
Apache wickiups (in the back) were made by
covering wooden dome-shaped frames
with grass.

Apaches belong to the Southern Athabaskan linguistic family, a Native American people inhabiting the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Various Apache tribes offered strong resistance to encroachment on their territory in the latter half of the 19th century. Present-day Apache populations are located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Apache is the collective name given to several culturally related tribes of Native Americans, aboriginal inhabitants of North America, who speak a Southern Athabaskan language. The modern term excludes the related Navajo people. The Apache peoples migrated from the Northern Plains into the Southwest relatively recently. Noted leaders have included Cochise, Mangas Coloradoans, and Geronimo. The U.S. Army found them to be fierce warriors and skillful strategists.

Apache Sunrise Dance
To become a woman, an Apache girl
had to perform the Sunrise Dance
which lasted four days.

Apaches belong to the Southern Athabaskan linguistic family, a Native American people inhabiting the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Various Apache tribes offered strong resistance to encroachment on their territory in the latter half of the 19th century. Present-day Apache populations are located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Apache is the collective name given to several culturally related tribes of Native Americans, aboriginal inhabitants of North America, who speak a Southern Athabaskan language. The modern term excludes the related Navajo people. The Apache peoples migrated from the Northern Plains into the Southwest relatively recently. Noted leaders have included Cochise, Mangas Coloradoans, and Geronimo. The U.S. Army found them to be fierce warriors and skillful strategists.

Apache Buffalo Hunt
Buffalo were hunted by the Apache for food,
because they were "clean," unlike turkeys and fish.

Apaches belong to the Southern Athabaskan linguistic family, a Native American people inhabiting the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Various Apache tribes offered strong resistance to encroachment on their territory in the latter half of the 19th century. Present-day Apache populations are located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Apache is the collective name given to several culturally related tribes of Native Americans, aboriginal inhabitants of North America, who speak a Southern Athabaskan language. The modern term excludes the related Navajo people. The Apache peoples migrated from the Northern Plains into the Southwest relatively recently. Noted leaders have included Cochise, Mangas Coloradoans, and Geronimo. The U.S. Army found them to be fierce warriors and skillful strategists.

Apache and Horses
Once the Apache learned about
horses from the Spanish,
horses became the main
transportation for the Apache.

Apaches belong to the Southern Athabaskan linguistic family, a Native American people inhabiting the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Various Apache tribes offered strong resistance to encroachment on their territory in the latter half of the 19th century. Present-day Apache populations are located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Apache is the collective name given to several culturally related tribes of Native Americans, aboriginal inhabitants of North America, who speak a Southern Athabaskan language. The modern term excludes the related Navajo people. The Apache peoples migrated from the Northern Plains into the Southwest relatively recently. Noted leaders have included Cochise, Mangas Coloradoans, and Geronimo. The U.S. Army found them to be fierce warriors and skillful strategists.

 

Books on the Apache

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Links to other sites on the Apache

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Apache Tribal Nation http://www.greatdreams.com/apache/apache-tribe.htm
American Indian Art http://www.curtis-collection.com
Indian Congress of 1898 http://www.omaha.lib.ne.us/transmiss/
congress/gallery/inap01.html
Kiowa Apache Tribe History http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/
kiowa/kiowaapachehist.htm
Yavapai-Apache http://www.yavapai-apache.org/
Native American Art http://www.american-native-art.com/publication/apache/apache.html
Lipan Apache (Tindi) http://www.indians.org/welker/lipanap.htm
 

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