Transportation during the Civil War

Transportation during the Civil War still consisted largely of infantry marches and horseback. Large equipment and supplies, such as cannons and cooking gear, were moved using horses and wagons.

Ships and trains were also used during the Civil War. At this time, steam was used to power both ships and trains. The steam engine and the steamboat were used to move large numbers of troops and equipment long distances.

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Horses played a major role in moving equipment and supplies. Here a blacksmith is shoeing horses at the Army of the Potomac headquarters, Antietam, Maryland (Source: Library of Congress).
The Army Corp of Engineers were responsible for building roads and bridges for troop transport. Here the 5th New Hampshire Infantry are building a bridge over the Chickahominy River in Virginia (Source: Library of Congress).
Railroads played a major role in moving troops and weapons. The Union corp of engineers laid tracks and built bridges for the military trains. (Source: Library of Congress).
Steamboats were used to move large numbers of troops. This picture shows the levee and steamboats in port at Vicksburg, Mississippi (Source: Library of Congress).
 

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