Pelvis or Pelvic Girdle

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The pelvis or pelvic girdle connects the trunk of your body with your legs. It supports the weight of the upper body when your are sitting and standing. It transfers the upper body weight to the lower limbs when standing and walking. The pelvis also provides support and attachment for the internal and external reproductive organs. Read on to learn more about the pelvis and see graphics of the pelvic girdle.

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Pelvis

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Pelvis or Pelvic Girdle - Anterior or Front View
Pelvis or Pelvic Girdle - Anterior or Front View

The word pelvis is a latin word meaning "basin." It gets this name from its shape, somewhat like a basin.

The pelvic girdle is a ring of bones connecting the spine, or vertebral column, to the femur bones in the legs. In the center of the pelvis is the Pelvic Cavity. The pelvic cavity contains and protects the reproductive organs and the rectum.

 

Pelvic Bones - Anterior or Front View
Pelvic Bones - Anterior or Front View

The pelvis consists of two hip bones connected to either side of the sacrum.

The each hip bone consists of three bones fused together. These are the ilium, pubis or pubic bone and ischium. The ilium is connected to the sacrum by the sacroiliac joints.

The lumbosacral joint connects the sacrum with the last lumbar vertebra in the spine. Other ligaments connect the hip joint with the femur bone in the leg. These ligaments provide movement for sitting, standing, walking and running.

 

Books on the Pelvis

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